06.27.11

Regular Exercise Lowers Risk for Atherosclerosis Progression

Posted in Wellness at 4:58 PM by Dr. Greathouse

Regular Exercise Lowers Risk for Atherosclerosis Progression CME

Regular physical activity remains the key to the prevention of atherosclerosis progression, even when patients are also receiving intensive lipid and glucose management through medication and diet.
Clinical Review, June 2011

06.04.11

Headache / Chiropractic Treatment of Adults With Headache

Posted in Manual Therapy Works at 9:08 PM by Dr. Greathouse

Evidence-Based Guidelines for the Chiropractic Treatment of Adults With Headache

Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics (JMPT)

Roland Bryans, DCa, Martin Descarreaux, DC, PhDb, Mireille Duranleau, DCc, Henri Marcoux, DCd, Brock Potter, DCe, Rick Ruegg, PhD, DCf, Lynn Shaw, PhDg, Robert Watkin, LLBh, Eleanor White, DCi

Received 22 December 2010; received in revised form 10 March 2011; accepted 3 April 2011. Volume 34, Issue 5, Pages 274-289 (June 2011)

Abstract

Objective

The purpose of this manuscript is to provide evidence-informed practice recommendations for the chiropractic treatment of headache in adults.

Methods

Systematic literature searches of controlled clinical trials published through August 2009 relevant to chiropractic practice were conducted using the databases MEDLINE; EMBASE; Allied and Complementary Medicine; the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature; Manual, Alternative, and Natural Therapy Index System; Alt HealthWatch; Index to Chiropractic Literature; and the Cochrane Library. The number, quality, and consistency of findings were considered to assign an overall strength of evidence (strong, moderate, limited, or conflicting) and to formulate practice recommendations.

Results

Twenty-one articles met inclusion criteria and were used to develop recommendations. Evidence did not exceed a moderate level. For migraine, spinal manipulation and multimodal multidisciplinary interventions including massage are recommended for management of patients with episodic or chronic migraine. For tension-type headache, spinal manipulation cannot be recommended for the management of episodic tension-type headache. A recommendation cannot be made for or against the use of spinal manipulation for patients with chronic tension-type headache. Low-load craniocervical mobilization may be beneficial for longer term management of patients with episodic or chronic tension-type headaches. For cervicogenic headache, spinal manipulation is recommended. Joint mobilization or deep neck flexor exercises may improve symptoms. There is no consistently additive benefit of combining joint mobilization and deep neck flexor exercises for patients with cervicogenic headache. Adverse events were not addressed in most clinical trials; and if they were, there were none or they were minor.

Conclusions

Evidence suggests that chiropractic care, including spinal manipulation, improves migraine and cervicogenic headaches. The type, frequency, dosage, and duration of treatment(s) should be based on guideline recommendations, clinical experience, and findings. Evidence for the use of spinal manipulation as an isolated intervention for patients with tension-type headache remains equivocal.

06.02.11

Death of the Tomato & Sad Truths About Our Agricultural System

Posted in Wellness at 9:51 AM by Dr. Greathouse

Why the Modern Tomato is Flawed: Inside Tomatoland

By Kurt Michael Friese

First let’s get one persistent canard out of the way. Yes, the tomato is technically a fruit, not a vegetable, but for purposes of economics the USDA classifies it as a vegetable, and as such it is the second most popular vegetable in the nation after that other burger staple, lettuce. This is surprising in only one respect: A vast majority of the tomatoes consumed in the U.S. every year ($5 billion worth), are devoid of the flavor and nutritive value they once had.

Sure, that plant your neighbor gave you that’s just beginning to enjoy the summer heat will produce lots of delicious, succulent tomatoes come August or September. But in his new book, Tomatoland: How Modern Industrial Agriculture Destroyed our Most Alluring Fruit, two-time James Beard Award-winning journalist Barry Estabrook tells us why the modern factory-farmed tomato in most grocery stores is a poster child for nearly everything that is wrong with industrial agriculture. A recent USDA study, he points out, says that the average tomato of today, the kind on your Whopper or Taco Bell taco, has “30 percent less vitamin C, 30 percent less thiamin 19 percent less niacin, and 62 percent less calcium than it did in the 1960s. But that modern tomato does shame its 1960s counterpart in one respect: It contains 14 times as much sodium.

This is because the tomatoes grown in the fields in and around Immokalee, Florida, where nearly one third of the tomatoes consumed in the U.S. are grown, are bred for one thing and one thing only. And it’s not flavor, and it’s not nutrition. It’s shipability, period. To qualify as grade A in that department, it needs to be a specific size, and a specific shape, and it needs to be picked while still green and rock hard. In fact, Estabrook relays a story of nearly losing control of his car as it was pelted with the tough green orbs bouncing off the back of a tractor-trailer on a Florida highway. The fruits hit the pavement at 60 mph and rolled to the gravel shoulder unscathed.

That truck was likely headed to one of the many enormous warehouses in the area, which “force-ripen” the fruit by smothering them with ethylene gas. This process does make them red, but it does not truly ripen them. Thus the sugars are nowhere near as developed as the ones in your back yard will be and the result is the mealy pink baseballs in your grocer’s produce section right now.

Our enormous appetite for having pretty much any food available to us at anytime of year has led to a system where yes, you can have a tomato in February, but the cost is a lot more than the $1.25/lb you’re likely to pay at your local Wal-Mart. It comes at the cost of enormous environmental damage and shocking worker abuse. It utilizes thousands of migrant workers, some of whom are undocumented, and many of whom live and work in literal slave conditions. And since the muggy lowlands of Florida are not native habitat, a tomato plant there can fall victim to as many as 27 separate insect species and 29 different diseases, necessitating a plethora of chemicals that are as hard on the workers and the land as they are on the pests. Then there’s the 31 different fungicides in use. The list goes on.

Tomatoland is based on Estabrook’s James Beard Award-winning 2010 article “The Price of Tomatoes,” and is an in-depth investigation of what’s wrong with the modern tomato (and by extension, modern agriculture). It is vital information that every conscientious eater-and parents of eaters-ought to know. Hopefully, as more people read the book, they will begin to look beyond price, and start considering cost.

06.01.11

Coffee linked to lower risk of fatal prostate cancer

Posted in Wellness at 10:53 AM by Dr. Greathouse

Click on link for news story or copy & past to browser.

http://www.cnn.com/2011/HEALTH/05/17/coffee.prostate.cancer/index.html

STORY HIGHLIGHTS

  • Drinking six or more cups per day can lower a man’s risk of fatal prostate cancer
  • Decreased risk of cancer was seen in men with both decaf and caffeinated

“It’s an important source of antioxidants and also has positive effects on glucose metabolism and insulin levels, and it’s thought that insulin plays a role in the progression of prostate cancer.”

Drinking as many as three 8-ounce cups a day has proven health benefits. But skip it if you have high blood pressure, an overactive thyroid, or suffer from anxiety, says Loren Wissner Greene, MD, a professor at the New York University School of Medicine.