04.25.12

New Migraine Guidelines Rank Rx, OTC Efficacy

Posted in Cold Laser, Headaches, McKenzie Mechanical Diagnosis & Treatment, Pain Management at 10:39 AM by Dr. Greathouse

New Migraine Guidelines Rank Rx, OTC Efficacy

By John Gever, Senior Editor, MedPage Today

Published: April 23, 2012

Reviewed by Zalman S. Agus, MD; Emeritus Professor, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of

Pennsylvania.

NEW ORLEANS — Seven different drugs are proven to be effective for preventing episodic migraine attacks and another half-dozen are probably helpful, according to new guidelines released here by the American Academy of Neurology (AAN).

See PDF attachment for on the latest on meds for migraines! Medical News: New Migraine Guidelines Rank Rx, OTC Efficacy – in , AAN from MedPage Today

Chiropractic and Migraine Headaches

For many  years chiropractors have been getting positive results with migraine headaches as well as other form of headaches. Unfortunately, the chiropractic profession has relied heavily on anecdotal evidence to promote these results, without good research to back it up, but there’s good data to suggest that there’s more to care than placebo effect. The key seems to be in the upper neck. Exactly what that is, has yet to be determine, but there are safe and effective ways to address joint problems in the upper neck. The Youtube clip I’m adding to this post is a good example of one of the safe ways to address headaches mechanically. We provide that technique. The McKenzie mechanical appraoch is also a valid & reliable technique as well, and is extremely effective. Not only is it effective but it puts you in control, not a drug or health care provider! I’ve even had great results with cold laser. If you are looking for an alternative to the medications, these techniques are well worth a try and can be determined in short order as to whether effective or not; saving you time and money. Even if you have been to a chiropractor before, these procedures may be new to you and prove beneficial.

If you have questions please feel free to call me so that I may address some of your concerns before you come.

Or go to YouTube: Chiropractic and Migraine Headaches NBC NEWS.mp4

Dr. Greathouse: 321-725-6314

04.04.12

Sitting straight ‘bad for backs’?

Posted in Spinal Hygiene at 4:23 PM by Dr. Greathouse

seating positions

Sitting up straight is not the best position for office workers, a study has suggested.

Scottish and Canadian researchers used a new form of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to show it places an unnecessary strain on your back.

They told the Radiological Society of North America that the best position in which to sit at your desk is leaning back, at about 135 degrees.

Experts said sitting was known to contribute to lower back pain.

Data from the British Chiropractic Association says 32% of the population spends more than 10 hours a day seated.

Half do not leave their desks, even to have lunch.

Two thirds of people also sit down at home when they get home from work.

Spinal angles

The research was carried out at Woodend Hospital in Aberdeen.

Twenty two volunteers with healthy backs were scanned using a positional MRI machine, which allows patients the freedom to move – so they can sit or stand – during the test.

Traditional scanners mean patients have to lie flat, which may mask causes of pain that stem from different movements or postures.

In this study, the patients assumed three different sitting positions: a slouching position, in which the body is hunched forward as if they were leaning over a desk or a video game console, an upright 90-degree sitting position; and a “relaxed” position where they leaned back at 135 degrees while their feet remained on the floor.

The researchers then took measurements of spinal angles and spinal disk height and movement across the different positions.

Spinal disk movement occurs when weight-bearing strain is placed on the spine, causing the disk to move out of place.

Disk movement was found to be most pronounced with a 90-degree upright sitting posture.

It was least pronounced with the 135-degree posture, suggesting less strain is placed on the spinal disks and associated muscles and tendons in a more relaxed sitting position.

The “slouch” position revealed a reduction in spinal disk height, signifying a high rate of wear and tear on the lowest two spinal levels.

When they looked at all test results, the researchers said the 135-degree position was the best for backs, and say this is how people should sit.

‘Tendency to slide’

Dr Waseem Bashir of the Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging at the University of Alberta Hospital, Canada, who led the study, said: “Sitting in a sound anatomic position is essential, since the strain put on the spine and its associated ligaments over time can lead to pain, deformity and chronic illness.”

Rishi Loatey of the British Chiropractic Association said: “One in three people suffer from lower back pain and to sit for long periods of time certainly contributes to this, as our bodies are not designed to be so sedentary.”

Levent Caglar from the charity BackCare, added: “In general, opening up the angle between the trunk and the thighs in a seated posture is a good idea and it will improve the shape of the spine, making it more like the natural S-shape in a standing posture.

“As to what is the best angle between thigh and torso when seated, reclining at 135 degrees can make sitting more difficult as there is a tendency to slide off the seat: 120 degrees or less may be better.”